Bible

The mission statement of the Wesleyan Bible department is to glorify God by:

  • Faithfully articulating the Truth of God’s Word
  • Presenting the person and saving work of Jesus Christ
  • Helping students become biblically literate
  • Challenging and nurturing their hearts and minds in order to impact their lives, thereby transforming God’s world
Grade Standard
9th Grade

Themes of the Old Testament

The Life of Jesus and the Book of Acts 

10th Grade

Bible Electives:

The Life of Jesus and the Book of Acts

11th Grade Bible Electives:
World Religions and the Great Commission
Contemporary Culture from a Biblical Perspective
Practical Apologetics: Faith and Doubt
Foundations of Faith
180-Degree Theology

Global Justice and Biblical Ethics

Eschatology: A Study of the End Times and the Book of Revelation

12th Grade Bible Electives:
World Religions and the Great Commission
Contemporary Culture from a Biblical Perspective
Practical Apologetics: Faith and Doubt
Foundations of Faith
180-Degree Theology
Global Justice and Biblical Ethics

Eschatology: A Study of the End Times and the Book of Revelation

Requirements

Students must complete the Themes of the Old Testament class before taking the Life of Jesus and the book of Acts course. Further, both of those courses must be completed before students are eligible to take one of the electives. Seniors will always be given priority in course placement. Therefore, sophomores and juniors should be aware of the possibility that they may not be placed in their first choice of Bible electives.

Course Descriptions

Themes of the Old Testament

This semester course will provide students with an introduction to the Old Testament. An emphasis will be placed on God’s promise to send a Messiah to save His people from their sins, and how that promise is progressively unfolded in the history of the Jewish people. The major themes of the Old Testament will be explored, showing their relevance to teenagers today.

(Semester Course)

The Life of Jesus and the Book of Acts

This semester course will focus on Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s promise in the Old Testament to send a Messiah to save His people from their sins. An emphasis will be placed on the teachings of Jesus and their relevance to teenagers today. The course will also study the beginnings of the Christian church.

(Semester Course)

World Religions and the Great Commission

This semester course will first survey the foundational beliefs and practices of the world’s leading religions. Students will explore and analyze what other people believe and why they believe it. Additionally, students will view such beliefs and practices through the prism of the Great Commission - the command of Christ to proclaim His gospel to all nations. This course will equip students with the tools they need to engage people from different faith commitments and more effectively present the gospel message to them.

(Semester Course)

Contemporary Culture from a Biblical Perspective

This semester course is designed to help students examine and apply the teaching of Jesus for Christians to be “in the world but not of the world.” Beginning with the presupposition that Christians are called to be transformers of culture, this course will teach students how to identify and discern both the subtle and overt messages that they are confronted with from contemporary culture. Proceeding from a Biblical worldview, students will explore contemporary music, film, television, and social media as they study the Christians’ call to engage the culture in which they live.

(Semester Course)

Practical Apologetics: Faith and Doubt

Practical Apologetics is a one-semester course designed to consider doubts and explore answers to many of the perennial questions asked by those in and outside of the Christian faith. Among such topics are the following: arguments for the existence of God, the problem of evil, the deity of Jesus Christ, the historicity of the resurrection, miracles, science and creationism, the authority and reliability of the Bible, as well as a number of other issues. The goal of this class is to provide students with a firm foundation for faith - one that will stand up to the storms of unbelief and critical attack.

(Semester Course)

Foundations of Faith

Throughout all generations, people have asked the profound questions pertaining to life: Why am I here, and what is my purpose? How do I know what is true? Why is there evil and how do I overcome it? Can I find happiness and if so, where? What happens upon our death? The goal of this semester course is to explore the answers to these questions and others by providing students with a theological framework and a more holistic understanding of essential Christian beliefs as they systematically study the Triune God of Christianity.

(Semester Course)

180 Degree Theology

With a primary emphasis on the book of Romans, this semester course will investigate Paul, the world’s most influential writer. Beginning with an overview of his life, this course will study Paul’s conversion and how that transformation has profoundly impacted the world ever since. While the four gospels describe Jesus’ ministry and death, in Romans, Paul examines the significance of that death and proclaims the radical doctrine of salvation by God’s grace. The objective of this course is for students to understand the counter-cultural message of the gospel, its diagnosis of and solution to the world’s problems, and its precepts for living a godly life in contemporary society.

(Semester Course)

Global Justice and Biblical Ethics

This semester course is designed to introduce students to issues of social justice, and to examine God’s call for His people to act justly and to love mercy (Micah 6:8). Topics to be explored include: world poverty and disease, genocide, the disparity of income among people and societies, justice for the weak and powerless of society, and human trafficking. The objectives of this course include students hearing and responding to God’s call by focusing on the message of the Old Testament prophets and to address social justice issues by applying the foundational principles of Biblical ethics.

(Semester Course)

Eschatology: A Study of the End Times and the Book of Revelation

This course is designed to give students a picture of the hope that God presents throughout Scripture and the promise that He is faithful to complete the redemption of all creation. Students will learn to articulate the events of the End Times as described in the Old and New Testaments. The concept of hope and the Doctrine of the Future will be traced from Genesis all the way to Revelation. Particular attention will be given to the Book of Revelation as students will walk through an exegesis of all 22 chapters.