What's Happening At Wesleyan

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    Zach and Studie Young Celebration Video & Photos

    April 16, 2014

    It was great to see so many members of the Wesleyan family - alumni, parents of alumni, current families, and friends of the school - come out in droves to celebrate Zach and Studie Young this past Thursday evening. What a special way to honor a very special man and his dedication to Wesleyan School. Thank You Zach!

  • The cast extraordinaire!

    "Into The Woods" receives a record 8 Shuler Nominations

    April 4, 2014

    High school students from across the state will walk the red carpet Thursday April 17 at the Georgia High School Musical Theater Awards ceremony, better known as the Shuler Hensley Awards. The Wolf Players' February production of Into The Woods has been nominated for a Wesleyan-record eight Shuler Awards, and received six more honorable mentions.

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    Cassie Pilgrim to Attend Curtis

    April 4, 2014

    Wesleyan junior, Cassie Pilgrim, has been chosen to attend the Curtis Institute of Music, which was recently ranked 3rd nationally among music schools (based on acceptance rate, tuition, and room and board. Please join us in congratulating Cassie and her family).

Wednesday April 23

8:55am Student Late Arrival

9:00am - 3:00pm
none

9th Grade Parent Coffee

9:00am - 10:00am
McKeever Room

Kindergarten & Pre-First Dance

3:00pm - 4:15pm
Dance studio
Thursday April 24

Parent U: Birds on a Wire Bible Study

8:15am - 10:00am
Brammer-Wilkinson Room

High School Fine Arts Week

9:45am - 10:30am
Powell Theater

Wesleyan At A Glance

Christian Life

The earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof the world, and they that dwell therein.

- Psalm 24:1

Wesleyan seeks to develop in each young person a desire to learn and to become a good citizen in serving the local community and the world beyond. The programs at Wesleyan promote spiritual, intellectual, physical and social growth. Through daily living, the school strives to create a community which exemplifies Christian values and demonstrates their implications for the individual and society.

- Greg Lisson, Director of Christian Life

The Arts At Wesleyan

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  • "Into The Woods" receives a record 8 Shuler Nominations

    High school students from across the state will walk the red carpet Thursday April 17 at the Georgia High School Musical Theater Awards ceremony, better known as the Shuler Hensley Awards. The Wolf Players' February production of Into The Woods has been nominated for a Wesleyan-record eight Shuler Awards, and received six more honorable mentions.

    Continue Reading
  • 4th Annual Visual Art Exhibit Opening

    Mark your calendar for the upcoming Visual Art Exhibit opening! Artwork from our talented MS and HS students will be on display in the Fine Arts building April 9th through May 7th. The opening is April 9th from 6:30-8:30.

    Continue Reading
Thursday April 24

High School Fine Arts Week

9:45am - 10:30am
Powell Theater

MS Fine Arts Day

12:00pm - 3:00pm
Powell Theater

High School Play

7:00pm - 10:00pm
Lencke Black Box Theater
Friday April 25

Lower School Fine Arts Day

8:00am - 3:00pm
Bowen Cafetorium, Classrooms, Bowen Cafetorium Stage

High School Fine Arts Week

9:45am - 10:30am
Powell Theater

Athletics At Wesleyan

Recent Scores

April 21, 2014
Middle School Baseball 3 L
Marist 4  
Varsity Boys Lacrosse 0 L
Marist 8  
April 19, 2014
Varsity Baseball 5 L
Westminster 14  
April 17, 2014
Middle School Boys Lacrosse 10 L
Johns Creek Feeder Team 12  
Varsity Boys Soccer 3 W
Cambridge 1  
Varsity Baseball 5 L
Westminster 13  
Varsity Boys Lacrosse 0 L
Blessed Trinity 13  
April 16, 2014
Junior Varsity Baseball 3 W
St. Pius X 1  
Middle School Baseball 8 W
Greater Atlanta Christian 6  
Varsity Girls Soccer 1 W
Pace 0  
Varsity Girls Tennis 4 W
Greater Atlanta Christian (Tournament) 0  
Varsity Boys Tennis 1 L
Greater Atlanta Christian (Tournament) 4  
Varsity Boys Tennis 0 L
Westminster (Tournament) 3  
Varsity Girls Tennis 6 L
Lovett (Tournament) 7  
April 15, 2014
Varsity Boys Soccer 2 L
Westminster 3  
Varsity Boys Lacrosse 10 W
Buford 7  
Middle School Boys Soccer 3 W
Whitefield 2  
Varsity Girls Lacrosse 7 L
Cambridge 20  
Varsity Girls Soccer 0 L
Westminster 5  
Varsity Baseball 1 L
Westminster 3  
Junior Varsity Girls Soccer 2 L
Westminster 7  
Middle School Girls Soccer 4 W
Whitefield 3  
Junior Varsity Boys Soccer 1 L
Westminster 6  
Junior Varsity Boys Lacrosse 8 W
Buford 5  
Middle School Boys Lacrosse 14 W
Lovett 13  

Beyond Wesleyan

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    Steven McCord '06

    Steven graduated with a degree in Mathematics from the University of Georgia, where he was president of the ROTC. Steven serves our country as an officer in the United States Air Force and is currently stationed in Korea.

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    Kristina Mohme Dawson '04

    Kristina graduated from the University of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia (now Georgia Regents University) College of Dental Medicine. She is a practicing dentist with Peachtree Corners Dental Associates.

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    Bryan Seiler '01

    A 2005 graduate of Wheaton College, Bryan earned his law degree and Masters of Public Policy from the University of Minnesota in 2008. He serves as in-house labor and employment counsel for The Salvation Army in suburban Chicago.

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  • Adriana Oliver

    Adriana Oliver ’07

    Adriana earned a Bachelor’s of Arts in Neuroscience and Medicine and Health and Society and a minor in Spanish from Vanderbilt University in 2011 and currently works as an intern for a healthcare consulting company in Atlanta.

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  • Ashley Yost '10

    Ashley Yost ’10

    Ashley is currently at the University of Georgia where she is double majoring in Digital & Broadcast Journalism and Sports Management.

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    Steven McCord '06

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for college?
    First and foremost, Wesleyan taught me how to communicate effectively and build meaningful relationships with others. In doing so, those relationships helped instill a solid spiritual foundation that shapes my worldview and serves as a frame of reference for decision-making, both personally and professionally. Wesleyan also required me to manage my time well - balancing academics, sports, and extra curricular activities - which proved instrumental in college, since college life lacks the rigid structure of high school. Finally, Wesleyan gave me the study skills and habits required to navigate a challenging degree program in Mathematics at the University of Georgia, while being involved in other activities around campus.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for your profession?
    Wesleyan taught me self-discipline, confidence, and a strong work ethic, which prove invaluable as an officer in the United States Air Force. In today’s rapidly changing political, economic, and military environment, everyone in the armed forces is being asked to do more with less but maintain the same high standards. Therefore, it’s crucial that I be able to meet the level of responsibility and accountability required to fly F-16’s in defense of our nation and its interest around the globe. As a single-seat fighter pilot, I’m constantly trying to improve my knowledge base, sharpen my tactical skills, and work synergistically with others. Thanks to Wesleyan, I have the discipline, work ethic, and team skills necessary to accomplish these goals.

    Why are you a better leader because of Wesleyan?
    Leadership takes many shapes depending on the circumstances of the situation encountered and where one finds his or herself in the chain of command. Sometimes that means being in charge and calling the shots, but more often, it means taking your commander’s - or boss’s - intent and figuring out what you need to do in order to achieve the desired outcome. Wesleyan presents students with the opportunity to engage in leadership from multiple perspectives, through which one not only learns how to lead, but how to lead well by putting others before yourself. Personally, I was blessed at Wesleyan to experience leadership directly through athletic and academic assignments and indirectly through servant leadership on mission trips and community service activities. Ultimately, I count myself a better leader today because Wesleyan taught me that leadership is more about people and relationships than managing resources and achieving a bottom line.

    Was a challenging academic Wesleyan education worth it? Why or why not?
    Absolutely! Wesleyan played a huge role in shaping me into the individual I am today. The curriculum prepared me for the challenging academic environment of college while the teachers and coaches prepared me for the challenges of life. Sure… there were times when things got busy - balancing academics, sports, and a social life - but the skills I learned and the relationships I built during my time at Wesleyan will benefit me for a lifetime. Many of my closest friends and most influential mentors have come from the Wesleyan family, and they continue to encourage me and help build me into a better individual today.

    Was the struggle worth it?
    Emphatically, yes! As Colin Creel and Marc Khedouri - two of my mentors from Wesleyan - used to say, “Pressure makes diamonds.” It’s through challenges and trials that we grow our faith and our character, and without Wesleyan, I would have missed out on many opportunities to develop into the Christian that I am today. I’m grateful to Wesleyan for the time I spent there and am excited to see how Wesleyan will continue to help shape the lives of future graduates.

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    Kristina Mohme Dawson '04

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for college?
    Wesleyan’s rigorous course load partnered with the encouragement to be involved outside of the classroom was an integral part of my success at Georgia. Wesleyan taught me the importance of preparation and the value of hard work. The personal attention that the teachers and the administration invested in me gave me the confidence to tackle any class while balancing other activities.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for your profession?
    Through a focus on critical thinking, hard work, and service, Wesleyan helped to prepare me to become a dentist. Wesleyan helped me to recognize my strengths in the Sciences from a young age. I learned the importance of hard work and time-management as I navigated Wesleyan’s high expectations inside and outside the classroom. The service opportunities that Wesleyan exposed me to helped to define and encourage me into a profession of service.

    Why are you a better leader because of Wesleyan?
    The teachers at Wesleyan serve as great mentors for Christian leadership. Wesleyan gave me several opportunities to lead both inside and outside of the classroom. These opportunities allowed me to establish my own values and learn to lead with compassion. These opportunities prepared me to navigate further leadership opportunities at Georgia and throughout dental school.

    Was a challenging academic Wesleyan education worth it? Why or why not?
    Yes! Wesleyan gave me a great foundation for higher education. Because of the high standards that Wesleyan maintains, I felt I developed a strong work ethic that translates to all facets of life. More importantly, Wesleyan encouraged me to grow in my faith. Today, I am happy to tell patients that I attended Wesleyan and feel very lucky to have benefited from such a nurturing environment.

    Was the struggle worth it?
    Definitely! Wesleyan forced me to learn to manage my time and balance work with family and friends. I learned to stretch myself with athletics and service opportunities outside of the classroom, while prioritizing my academics amongst a busy schedule. Finding success in a challenging and competitive environment gave me a sense of pride and accomplishment that helped shape me into who I am today.

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    Bryan Seiler '01

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for college?
    My family moved to the Atlanta area shortly before my junior year of high school. My first year in the area, I attended a public school in the Northern suburbs. Unfortunately, the school was overcrowded and the classes often felt more like crowd control than an actual learning opportunity. As a result of this experience, I applied to Wesleyan and decided to make the move for my senior year because I felt it would be a better preparation for college. The move could not have gone better. Wesleyan teachers raised the bar and challenged me personally to do my best. Just as importantly, my classmates were - as much as any high school students, at least - interested in learning and succeeding and attending good colleges. From AP classes that allowed me to place out or up in my college work, to crucial development of analytical thinking skills, Wesleyan was the preparation for college that I so desperately wanted.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for your profession?
    I have the privilege to work as an in-house attorney for The Salvation Army's regional headquarters in suburban Chicago. Before that, I worked for several years at a large Minneapolis law firm. As an attorney, analytical thinking and writing are the primary tools of my trade. My teachers at Wesleyan preached these skills, and I owe a permanent debt of gratitude to my AP English teacher, Ms. McIntyre, for being one of the first teachers to challenge me to read serious books, ask questions, and critically engage with the texts. She also taught us all to stop using passive voice and to pay close attention to our prose, catching our attention when the first paper was returned with a grade for content and a grade for grammar that for many of us was close to zero! I always loved reading and writing, but Wesleyan pushed me to take these interests to a new level.

    Why are you a better leader because of Wesleyan?
    Often, developing leadership skills is a matter of opportunity. The size of Wesleyan allowed me to participate more directly in a number of activities that I never would have in public school. As a musician, I spent a lot of time working with the school's praise band. Although I really didn't notice at the time, in retrospect, it is clear that the leaders (Colin Creel and Brad Mauldin) were quite intentional about nurturing my involvement and leadership in this group. Although music is still a part of my life, the more important life lessons that I take from this time are about leadership and collaboration.

    Perhaps most importantly, Wesleyan teachers and staff encouraged me to develop a Christian worldview, instilling in all of us the knowledge that our faith informs every aspect of our lives. That continues to inform the way that I look at the world around me, and I think I'm a better person and leader because of that perspective.

    Was a challenging academic Wesleyan education worth it? Why or why not?
    Absolutely. Life is full of challenges, from any further education after high school to career challenges and even our personal development as adults. Wesleyan provides a safe, nurturing environment for its students to begin responding to and learning from challenges. These are lifelong disciplines, and, for Christians, it is the essence of our daily walk with Christ.

    Was the struggle worth it?
    Without question. If we ever stop seeking and responding to challenges, we risk becoming stagnant. I'm thankful for my time at Wesleyan, even though it meant moving schools once more, at a time when it would have been easier to stay with the people that I knew at my previous school. I still wish that I had a longer time at Wesleyan, but I am thankful for the lifelong impact of my year at Wesleyan. I can happily report that the struggle to move schools and voluntarily take on a more challenging academic environment was well worth it.

  • Adriana Oliver

    Adriana Oliver ’07

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for college?
    Wesleyan prepared me for college by providing me with a strong academic background that allowed me to face college with confidence. While beginning my first classes at Vanderbilt, I felt completely prepared and ready to tackle any academic challenges that came my way. In Wesleyan's small, supportive community, I cultivated valuable interpersonal and leadership skills that I continued to develop and hone throughout my undergraduate years. It was this foundation-- comprised of rigorous academics and strong interpersonal skills-- that I formed while at Wesleyan that allowed me to become the independent thinker and the determined individual that I am today.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for your profession?
    Aside from equipping me with a strong academic and interpersonal foundation, Wesleyan prepared me for my profession by providing me with an environment in which I was exposed to peers and faculty who were great models of professionalism. These intangible skills are ones that undoubtedly have led to my professional success thus far. More significant, however, is the way in which Wesleyan has strongly shaped my professional goals. Although I am currently working as an intern for a healthcare consulting company, my ultimate professional goal is to become a dentist and work with under-served populations. It was during my years at Wesleyan that I was able to explore my passion for service and helping others through the many experiences with which it provided me. The mission trips that I took through Wesleyan to Peru and Brazil generated my strong desire and current professional goal of working with the under-served Spanish-speaking population in the medical arena.

    Why are you a better leader because of Wesleyan?
    By providing me with leadership opportunities in several different arenas, Wesleyan not only taught me but placed me in situations in which I was able to discover what is required of a good leader. These important lessons of humility, patience, and respect for yourself and others are ones that have made me better equipped to seek out and assume leadership positions upon leaving Wesleyan. While at Vanderbilt, I felt confident in my leadership skills and easily transitioned into undertaking leadership positions, including those of Philanthropy Benefit Chair and Music Chair for my sorority and of VUceptor (peer leadership). Whether through its teachers and coaches, mission trip, Bible study leaders, or faculty and student body at large, Wesleyan provided exemplary models of leadership, from which I am grateful to have learned how to be a stronger leader.

    Was a challenging academic Wesleyan education worth it? Why or why not?
    Definitely! By experiencing challenging academics at Wesleyan, I felt confident and prepared for the next level of academics that I met at Vanderbilt. Because of Wesleyan's high standard of education, I had already developed a strong work ethic, which made the demands of a college curriculum much easier. As a science major, I remember how prepared I felt when taking science courses in college, for I felt that I had already mastered a lot of the material. I even used my AP Biology notes a few times, so thank you, Mrs. Fedas! There's really no way to explain how well Wesleyan prepared me academically.

    Was the struggle worth it?
    Yes! Working hard at Wesleyan certainly pays off. It has opened many doors for me, including receiving a full scholarship to the college of my choice. Although my high school experience was challenging at times, I will always look back at the people that I met, the lessons that I learned, and the memories that I made there with great joy. Wesleyan was an important part of the journey that has led me to where and who I am today, and I couldn't be more grateful.

  • Ashley Yost '10

    Ashley Yost ’10

    Why are you a better leader because of Wesleyan?
    Wesleyan expected us to be leaders. Wesleyan expected us to be leaders because they had a desire for us to be our best. Our best was wanted because Wesleyan cared about us and we experienced success because Wesleyan believed in us. I always knew this domino effect existed; however, I was not made fully aware of the impact of this effect until second semester of my freshman year of college. I had been on a spring break mission trip with Wesleyan my senior year of high school to the Dominican Republic. It was then that I fell in love with the ministry and the people there. My freshman year of college I wanted to bring a team of college students back to the same place where I had served the year before with Wesleyan. I was inexperienced, underfinanced, and nervous. I sent out letters to the Wesleyan family and the amount of support I received financially, emotionally, and spiritually was overwhelming! Because of the support I received from the people of Wesleyan, I was no longer underfinanced nor was I nervous about the fact that I was inexperienced. The people at Wesleyan were not only willing to follow Jesus, but they also believed in me. With Jesus going before me and the support of the Wesleyan family behind me, I was able to lead a group of college students on spring break mission trips to the Dominican Republic for both of my college spring breaks.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for college?
    First, Wesleyan taught me that it is perfectly fine to wear the same thing to class every day of the week. Second, Wesleyan taught me that the key to memorization is group recitation every Monday and Friday morning. Third, Wesleyan taught me that a long, hard day can always be made better with a little QT. Fourth, Wesleyan taught me how to chew gum like a lady even at football games because if I didn’t Mr. Young was sure to say something about it. Fifth, at Wesleyan I learned that you might think that a 92 is a 4.0, but…you’re wrong. Sixth, at Wesleyan I learned that no matter how sick you are you can always go to school. The amount of work you will miss if you stay home is far worse than any sickness—even senioritis! Seventh, Wesleyan taught me that winning championships is expected. Eighth, Wesleyan taught me how to trust others by never putting a lock on my locker to keep my books safe. I also learned to trust that my friends wouldn’t mind when I casually borrowed a book out of their lockers. Don’t worry…I always brought it back, which proves that I also learned the value of commitment. Ninth, at Wesleyan I learned that it is completely normal to have your teacher’s cell phone numbers programmed into your phone. Tenth, Wesleyan allowed me to come to the realization that the grass is in fact, NEVER greener on the other side. The list of lessons I learned at Wesleyan is endless, but I digress.

    How did Wesleyan prepare you for your profession?
    No profession for me! Thankfully I still have two more years of college before I am thrown out into the "real word." However, I am a double major in Digital & Broadcast Journalism as well as Sports Management. My dream is to be a sideline analyst for basketball and football, but if I do not get there then I want to work in some area of sports journalism, broadcasting or reporting. I am sure that my involvement with athletics while I was at Wesleyan will help me with my future professional endeavors.

    Was a challenging academic Wesleyan education worth it? Why or why not?
    Yes. My Wesleyan education was definitely worth it. At Wesleyan we did not have a choice. We had to study. Therefore, when I was presented with difficult classes in college, I was able to be effective in those classes because while I was at Wesleyan I had developed the skills to be successful when presented with a challenge. Yes it was difficult, but I would do it again. My Wesleyan education has greatly helped me with college. I am currently answering these questions before class while sitting with some friends. I asked my friend if he felt that his high school education prepared him for college. He responded, “Definitely not. I had to re-teach myself everything once I got to college.”

    Was the struggle worth it?
    Yes. I am going to be that girl…I loved Wesleyan! I came into high school as a new student my freshman year and I instantly felt at home. At Wesleyan I made friends that I will have for the rest of my life. We are like a family. There are not words for how much my friends have enriched my life. They still continue to bless me even while we are spread out. However, when we come back together, it is like we never missed a beat. I could not have dreamed for better friends than the ones I made at Wesleyan. Also, so many teachers and coaches poured into my life in ways that went far above and beyond their job description. They were not only men and women that I respected, but they were also men and women to whom I could relate. My teachers and coaches really did genuinely care about me. My teachers at Wesleyan taught me far more than just academics. The lessons that I learned from my teachers outside of the classroom are the lessons that I cherish the most. The relationships I made with some of my teachers and coaches at Wesleyan impacted me in ways that I cannot describe. I always felt honored to be able to attend such a prestigious school as Wesleyan, but more importantly, I was blessed to have been able to establish the relationships I did there.